Unit #9
Mar 1-7
1.  Learn about research papers
2.  Get a CCU library account (for online research)
3.  Decide on a topic
4.  Write thesis statement 
5.  General Research (lots of reading using your "scanning skills")
6.  Essay map
7.  Basic Outline
8.  In-depth Research
9.  Annotated Bibliography.  
10.  Make any changes to your thesis statement and essay map 
11.  Better Outline
12.  Bibliography
13.  Intro Paragraph
14.  First Main Point (Roman Numeral #1)
15.  First Complete Draft
16.  Abstract
17.  Title Page 
18.  Finish APA format
19.  Peer Review
20. Transfer everything to a Word document 
9.1  Annotated Bibliography

Read and take notes over Annotated Bibliographies by "clicking here"
This link will take you to the first page, in the left column, there are three sections: 
1. Annotated Bibliographies
2. Annotated Bibliography Breakdown
3. Annotated Bibliography Samples
 (1 hour)

Submit 9.1 Notes Mar 2 (10 pts)


9.2 Writing Annotated Bibliographies

Put together annotated bibliographies in APA format according to the examples on the website you took notes over.  I need you to do 10 annotations

To do this correctly, you must put in about 6 hours.  DO NOT try to do all of these at once.  Spread them out over the week.

Here is an example of several annotated bibliographies I put together

Submit 9.2 on Mar 7 (60 points)

Total Hours:  7 hours

Watch both lectures below to learn about bibliographies and annotated bibliographies
Your "Soon-To-Be" 
Best Friend
References

Angert, B.L. (2005).  Education defined...policy or pupils passionately pursuing personal 

growth?  Retrieved January 14, 2007, from http://www.eric.ed.gov/

ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2/content_storage_01/0000000b/80/31/b8/67.pdf

Beck, M. & Malley, J.  (1998). A pedagogy of belonging.  Reclaiming Children and 

Youth, 7, 133-137.  Retrieved November 20, 2006, from ProQuest database.

Boser, J. & Poppen, W.A. (1978).  Identification of teacher verbal response roles for 

improving student-teacher relationships.  Journal of Educational Research, 72. 

90-95. Retrieved October 20, 2006, from EBSCO database.   

Collinson, V., Killeavy, M., & Stephenson, H.  (1998, April 12).  Exemplary teachers:  

        Practicing an ethic of care in England, Ireland, and the United States.  Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of

        the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA.

Cook-Sather, A. (2002).  A teacher should be…when the answer is the question.  

Knowledge Quest, 30, 12-15.  Retrieved November 19, 2006, from ProQuest database.

Davis, H.A. (2003).  Conceptualizing the role and influence of student-teacher relationships 

        on children’s social and cognitive development.  Educational Psychologist, 38, 207-234.  Retrieved October 21, 

        2006, from EBSCO database.   

Davis, H.A. (2006).  Exploring the contexts of relationship quality between middle school students and teachers.  The

        Elementary School Journal, 106, 193-224.  Retrieved November 19, 2006, from ProQuest database.

Deiro, J.A. (2003).  Do your students know you care?  Educational Leadership, 60, 60-

65. Retrieved October 2, 2006, from ProQuest database.












     Angert, B.L. (2005).  Education defined...policy or pupils passionately pursuing personal growth?  Retrieved January 14, 2007, from http://www.eric.ed.gov/
ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2/content_storage_01/0000000b/80/31/b8/67.pdf

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects, if any, that teacher-student relationships have on learning.  The hypothesis was that if a teacher individualizes the curriculum, they will facilitate the love of learning.  The project consisted of five groups of students, which met for one hour each day over an eighteen week period.  The class required was a “Fine Arts” class.  Students were from various socio-economic backgrounds and had parents who were rarely involved in their education.  The conclusion of the study found that there is a strong relationship between the educator and the student.  This relationship also forms a bond between the student and the subject area, the school, and the idea of education.  Following Angert’s observations of the study, she spent a great deal of time discussing HOW to help students grow and how to care for them.  She concluded the article with her own approaches to education and caring.

This journal article was interesting to me in the fact that it not only showed research results, but also gave many “how-tos” in order to show my students that I care for them.  The article is useful to me because of the introspection the author shared about her results that can be used in my classroom experience.  



     Beck, M. & Malley, J.  (1998).  A pedagogy of belonging.  Reclaiming Children and Youth, 7, 133-137.  Retrieved November 20, 2006, from ProQuest database.

The article begins by describing the need for positive relationships in school because of the changing demographics of the nuclear and extended family structure.  The author claims that positive relationships in the classroom—especially between the teacher and the student, help provide a positive learning experience for students.  Because a student often spends more face-to-face time with their teacher than with any other person, they tend to depend on the teacher for that sense of belonging.  The author then focuses the discussion to at-risk youth by explaining that teachers naturally react to rejected students in predictable ways which encourage at-risk students to respond in predictable ways.  Finally, research findings for teachers to use when dealing with students are given.

This was a great article because of the sources listed as well as new ideas in the dealing with at-risk youth.



     Boser, J. & Poppen, W.A. (1978).  Identification of teacher verbal response roles for improving student-teacher relationships.  Journal of Educational Research, 72. 90-95.  Retrieved October 20, 2006, from EBSCO database.   

The research in this article was done to determine which of seven verbal responses between teachers and students proved best for improving the relationships at the junior high level.  The response roles included:  feelings, thoughts, motives, behavior, encounter/encouragement, confrontation, and sharing.  Students were asked to report the frequency of teachers they had good and poor relationships with had used each response.  
It was said that:  “there does seem to exist a strong association between best student-teacher relationships and the teacher response roles of feelings, thoughts, encounter/encouragement, sharing, and motives; the response role of confrontation is associated with poorest student-teacher relationships at the ninth grade level.”

It was good to see some research on the topic of Teacher/student relationships.  I need to remember to look deeper into the Wilcoxon Signed-ranks Test that was used to compare the frequency with which each response role was used in best and worst relationships. 



     Collinson, V., Killeavy, M., &  Stephenson, H.  (1998, April 12).  Exemplary teachers:  Practicing an ethic of care in England, Ireland, and the United States.  Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA.

The article began with an in-depth definition of teacher care and how this care makes teachers more competent.  In the three countries discussed, England, Ireland, and the United States; it was reported that very little was found in the area of what a teacher should do to show care in the classroom.  Therefore, the purpose of the research discussed in this article focused on determining “exemplary teachers’ understanding of the role and development of an ethic of care in good teaching.”  Participants in the study were teachers, representing all three countries, which were engaged in a three hour interview.  It was found that these teachers showed students care while communicating verbally and through writing in the classroom setting as well as chance meeting in the community or at extra-curricular activities.  Other opportunities to know students, according to the research, was through other teachers’ perspectives as well as by understanding the various cultures represented.  In the study, three types of relationships were discovered:  teacher-student, student-student, and student-teacher.  Each of these relationships was discussed as to how the teacher could use them to show students they were cared for.  In conclusion, the findings suggested that respect for and by the teacher was a vital foundation for learning in the classroom.  This respect showed students care between each other and with the teacher.

This article was an encouragement since it approached teacher care using the interview as its sole method of gaining information.  It gave many testimonies from seasoned teachers who had tried many different ways to show teacher care and then settled on the ones that worked best for them.  I can see that this article will be very helpful to me as I look at the different methods to show care for students in my research project.  The article also had good bibliographies that I will have to examine further.